Oracle MySQL 5.5.8 GA

MySQL 5.5.8 GA

Back in December when I updated my twitter status to announce MySQL 5.5 general availability, I was very happy at that moment. It was the first major and much awaited release of MySQL after Oracle – the database giant acquired Sun (and so MySQL). Though MySQL 6.0 is not an active project right now and there are many strategic changes after Oracle’s acquisition of Sun for MySQL’s development road-map, but as a AMP developer it was news to be happy about.

Good to see MySQL founder Michael “Monty” Widenius, has forked MySQL as MariaDB, which is binary compatible (drop-in replacement) with MySQL. Good to see open-source efforts to keep the momentum alive.

Moving back to MySQL, with version 5.5 there are lot of new enhancements including performance improvements for both MyISAM and InnoDB storage engine. InnoDB gets updated to latest version InnoDB 1.1. There are many improvements with replication and couple of new feature addition with replication as well. I have been using MySQL-Replication since long time (3 years now) and I am excited about the replication heartbeat and all new improvements which are made in that direction.

Some of the highlights from MySQL.com about 5.5 are as following:

MySQL Database 5.5 delivers enterprise features, including:

  • Improved! Up to 1500% faster performance on Windows
  • Improved! Up to 370% faster performance on Linux
  • Improved! Better scalabilty on modern, multi-core, multi-CPU hardware
  • New! Performance Schema for monitoring MySQL server run-time performance
  • New! Semi-synchronous replication to ensure data consistency and redundancy
  • New! Replication Heartbeat to immediately uncover replication interruptions
  • New! Partitioning options for faster lookups
  • New! Easier development and debugging of stored procedures, functions, and triggers
  • Reliability requiring little or no intervention to achieve continuous uptime
  • Ease of use with “15 minutes to success” installation and configuration
  • Low administration with very little database maintenance required
  • Replication providing flexible topologies for scale-out and high availability
  • Partitioning to improve performance and management of very large database environments
  • ACID Transactions to build reliable and secure business critical applications
  • Stored Procedures to improve developer productivity
  • Triggers to enforce complex business rules at the database level
  • Views to ensure sensitive information is not compromised
  • Information Schema to provide easy access to metadata
  • Pluggable Storage Engine Architecture for maximum flexibility

I have just started MySQL 5.5 deployment on our production servers one by one and performance difference is visible while running the application.

To learn more refer:

What’s New in MySQL 5.5? Performance and Scalability – Benchmarks Presentation

http://www.scribd.com/doc/42200951/MySQL-What-s-New-in-5-5

Oracle Blog: What’s new in MySQL 5.5

Introduction to MySQL 5.5

Back in December when I updated my twitter status to announce MySQL 5.5 general availability, I was very happy at that moment. It was the first major and much awaited release of MySQL after Oracle – the database giant acquired Sun (and so MySQL). Though MySQL 6.0 is not an active project right now and there are many strategic changes after Oracle’s acquisition of Sun for MySQL’s development road-map, but as a AMP developer it was news to be happy about.